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Doctors believe that children need sunglasses more than adults
- Aug 25, 2018 -


Ophthalmologists believe that excessive exposure to ultraviolet light increases the risk of eye diseases such as cataracts and eye cancer. Many adults have the habit of wearing sunglasses. Does the child need to wear sunglasses? Many parents believe that children do not need to wear sunglasses.

 

In fact, doctors believe that children need to wear sunglasses more than adults. The American Academy of Optometry (AOA) pointed out that sunglasses are a necessity for people of all ages, because children's eyes are more transparent than adults, and ultraviolet rays are more likely to reach the retina, so sunglasses are more needed.


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The ophthalmologist also gave some advice on how to choose sunglasses for the child. The first is to look at the UV blocking rate. Choose glasses that block 100% UVA and UVB rays to maximize UV blocking. Secondly, the UV protection ability of the sunglasses has nothing to do with the color of the lens. Therefore, as long as the lens can block 100% of the sun's ultraviolet rays, the lens color can be selected according to the child's preference. However, studies have shown that long-term exposure to high-energy visible light (blue light) can also cause eye damage, so consider choosing an amber or brass lens to block blue light. Finally, sunglasses are best to choose larger lenses, not only to protect the eyes, but also to protect the skin around the eyes, and according to the child's lively and curious characteristics, choose safety resin lenses and sunglasses suitable for children's wearing habits.

 

Ophthalmologists also warn that the sun's damage to the eyes does not only occur in the sunny days of spring and summer, but also in the autumn and winter and cloudy days, because the sun can pass through the haze and thin clouds. So whenever you are outdoors, remember to wear UV protection sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat.


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